2021-08-26

Phototag with 25 photos

Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Torre de Belém, Lisbon, Portugal
Belém Tower (Portuguese: Torre de Belém) is a 16th-century fortification located in Lisbon that served as a point of embarkation and disembarkation for Portuguese explorers and as a ceremonial gateway to Lisbon. It was built during the height of the Portuguese Renaissance, and is a prominent example of the Portuguese Manueline style. Since 1983, the tower has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the Jerónimos Monastery.
Torre de Belém, Lisbon, Portugal
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
The Tagus (Spanish: Tajo; Portuguese: Tejo) is the longest river in the Iberian Peninsula. The river rises in the Montes Universales in mid-eastern Spain, flows 1,007 km to empty into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon. Its mouth is a large estuary culminating at the major port, and Portuguese capital, Lisbon.
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
Padrão dos Descobrimentos, Lisbon, Portugal
Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument of the Discoveries) is a monument on the northern bank of the Tagus River estuary, in the civil parish of Santa Maria de Belém, Lisbon. Located along the river where ships departed to explore and trade with India and the Orient, the monument celebrates the Portuguese Age of Discovery (or Age of Exploration) during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Padrão dos Descobrimentos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal
The Jerónimos Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro dos Jerónimos) is a former monastery of the Order of Saint Jerome near the Tagus river in the parish of Belém, in the Lisbon Municipality, Portugal; it was secularised on 28 December 1833 by state decree and its ownership transferred to the charitable institution, Real Casa Pia de Lisboa. The monastery is one of the most prominent examples of the Portuguese Late Gothic Manueline style of architecture in Lisbon. It was classified a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém, in 1983.
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Lisbon, Portugal