river

Phototag with 25 photos

Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
The Praça do Comércio is a large, harbour-facing square in Portugal's capital, Lisbon, being one of the largest in Portugal, with 175 by 175 m (574 by 574 ft), that is, 30,600 m2 (329,000 ft2). Facing the Tagus (Tejo) to the South, the city square is still commonly known in Portuguese as Terreiro do Paço as it hosted the Paço da Ribeira (Royal Palace of Ribeira) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake (the subway station located there is still called after the old name of the square). After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa), ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was (chief) Minister of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of the Portuguese King José I.
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
The Praça do Comércio is a large, harbour-facing square in Portugal's capital, Lisbon, being one of the largest in Portugal, with 175 by 175 m (574 by 574 ft), that is, 30,600 m2 (329,000 ft2). Facing the Tagus (Tejo) to the South, the city square is still commonly known in Portuguese as Terreiro do Paço as it hosted the Paço da Ribeira (Royal Palace of Ribeira) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake (the subway station located there is still called after the old name of the square). After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa), ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was (chief) Minister of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of the Portuguese King José I.
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
Torre de Belém, Lisbon, Portugal
Belém Tower (Portuguese: Torre de Belém) is a 16th-century fortification located in Lisbon that served as a point of embarkation and disembarkation for Portuguese explorers and as a ceremonial gateway to Lisbon. It was built during the height of the Portuguese Renaissance, and is a prominent example of the Portuguese Manueline style. Since 1983, the tower has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the Jerónimos Monastery.
Torre de Belém, Lisbon, Portugal
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
The Tagus (Spanish: Tajo; Portuguese: Tejo) is the longest river in the Iberian Peninsula. The river rises in the Montes Universales in mid-eastern Spain, flows 1,007 km to empty into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon. Its mouth is a large estuary culminating at the major port, and Portuguese capital, Lisbon.
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
Padrão dos Descobrimentos, Lisbon, Portugal
Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument of the Discoveries) is a monument on the northern bank of the Tagus River estuary, in the civil parish of Santa Maria de Belém, Lisbon. Located along the river where ships departed to explore and trade with India and the Orient, the monument celebrates the Portuguese Age of Discovery (or Age of Exploration) during the 15th and 16th centuries.
Padrão dos Descobrimentos, Lisbon, Portugal
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
The Praça do Comércio is a large, harbour-facing square in Portugal's capital, Lisbon, being one of the largest in Portugal, with 175 by 175 m (574 by 574 ft), that is, 30,600 m2 (329,000 ft2). Facing the Tagus (Tejo) to the South, the city square is still commonly known in Portuguese as Terreiro do Paço as it hosted the Paço da Ribeira (Royal Palace of Ribeira) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake (the subway station located there is still called after the old name of the square). After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa), ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was (chief) Minister of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of the Portuguese King José I.
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
Castelo de São Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal
São Jorge Castle (Portuguese: Castelo de São Jorge) is a historic castle in the Portuguese capital of Lisbon, located in the freguesia of Santa Maria Maior.
Castelo de São Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal
Castelo de São Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal
São Jorge Castle (Portuguese: Castelo de São Jorge) is a historic castle in the Portuguese capital of Lisbon, located in the freguesia of Santa Maria Maior.
Castelo de São Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal
Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal
The Alfama is the oldest neighborhood of Lisbon, spreading on the slope between the São Jorge Castle and the Tagus river. Its name comes from the Arabic Al-hamma (الحَمّة), meaning 'hot fountains' or 'baths,' akin to 'hammam' (حَمَّام). It contains many important historical attractions, as well as an abundance of Fado bars and restaurants.
Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal
Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal
The Alfama is the oldest neighborhood of Lisbon, spreading on the slope between the São Jorge Castle and the Tagus river. Its name comes from the Arabic Al-hamma (الحَمّة), meaning 'hot fountains' or 'baths,' akin to 'hammam' (حَمَّام). It contains many important historical attractions, as well as an abundance of Fado bars and restaurants.
Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
The Praça do Comércio is a large, harbour-facing square in Portugal's capital, Lisbon, being one of the largest in Portugal, with 175 by 175 m (574 by 574 ft), that is, 30,600 m2 (329,000 ft2). Facing the Tagus (Tejo) to the South, the city square is still commonly known in Portuguese as Terreiro do Paço as it hosted the Paço da Ribeira (Royal Palace of Ribeira) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake (the subway station located there is still called after the old name of the square). After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa), ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was (chief) Minister of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of the Portuguese King José I.
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
Senigallia harbor
Senigallia harbor
Fishing at dawn
Fishing at dawn
Senigallia harbor at dawn
Senigallia harbor at dawn
Senigallia harbor at dawn
Senigallia harbor at dawn
Senigallia Harbor, at Night
Senigallia Harbor, at Night
Senigallia harbor
Senigallia harbor
Corso II Giugno bridge at night
Corso II Giugno bridge reflected in Misa river at night.
Corso II Giugno bridge at night
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night. Portici Ercolani (Ercolani's Arcades) are sequence of 126 arches of Istria stone along the right bank of Misa river in Senigallia, Ancona, Italy. They owe their name to Monsignor Giuseppe Ercolani (1677-1759) who designed them in the mid-eighteenth century to house the many merchants who arrived in town in July, for the famous trade fair named after St. Mary Magdalene.
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night