bridge

Phototag with 13 photos

Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Porto, Portugal
Porto or Oporto is the second-largest city in Portugal, the capital of the Porto District, and one of the Iberian Peninsula's major urban areas. Located along the Douro River estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996, as 'Historic Centre of Porto, Luiz I Bridge and Monastery of Serra do Pilar'. The historic area is also a National Monument of Portugal.
Porto, Portugal
Palácio da Bolsa, Porto, Portugal
The Stock Exchange Palace (Portuguese: Palácio da Bolsa) is a historical building in Porto, Portugal. The palace was built in the 19th century by the city's Commercial Association (Portuguese: Associação Comercial do Porto) in Neoclassical style. It is located in the Infante D. Henrique Square in the historical centre of Porto, designated World Heritage Site by UNESCO.
Palácio da Bolsa, Porto, Portugal
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
The Praça do Comércio is a large, harbour-facing square in Portugal's capital, Lisbon, being one of the largest in Portugal, with 175 by 175 m (574 by 574 ft), that is, 30,600 m2 (329,000 ft2). Facing the Tagus (Tejo) to the South, the city square is still commonly known in Portuguese as Terreiro do Paço as it hosted the Paço da Ribeira (Royal Palace of Ribeira) until it was destroyed by the great 1755 Lisbon earthquake (the subway station located there is still called after the old name of the square). After the earthquake, the square was completely remodeled as part of the rebuilding of the Pombaline Downtown (Baixa), ordered by Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal, who was (chief) Minister of Portugal from 1750 to 1777, during the reign of the Portuguese King José I.
Praça do Comércio, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
In 1846, one of Lisbon’s most significant factories, the weaving and textile company Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense, found its home in Alcântara. In the following years, the 23.000m2 industrial site was occupied by the food processing company Companhia Industrial de Portugal e Colónias and by printers Anuário Comercial de Portugal and Gráfica Mirandela. After years of being hidden from the public eye, this little fraction of the city has now been unveiled and returned to the community in the form of Lx Factory. This creative hub is fuelled by companies and industry professionals, but it has also been brought to life by an array of different events in fields such as fashion, advertising, communication, multimedia, art, architecture and music, among others, which have encouraged countless visitors to rediscover this part of Alcântara.
Lx Factory, Lisbon, Portugal
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
The Tagus (Spanish: Tajo; Portuguese: Tejo) is the longest river in the Iberian Peninsula. The river rises in the Montes Universales in mid-eastern Spain, flows 1,007 km to empty into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon. Its mouth is a large estuary culminating at the major port, and Portuguese capital, Lisbon.
Tejo, Lisbon, Portugal
Bridge made of wooden blocks
Colorful wooden toy blocks. Lined up to form a bridge.
Bridge made of wooden blocks
Sightseeing in Venice
Sightseeing in Venice. Venice, capital of northern Italy’s Veneto region, is built on more than 100 small islands in a marshy lagoon in the Adriatic Sea. Its stone palaces seemingly rise out of the water. There are no cars or roadways, just canals and boats. The Grand Canal snakes through the city, which is filled with innumerable narrow, mazelike alleys and small squares.
Sightseeing in Venice
Corso II Giugno bridge at night
Corso II Giugno bridge reflected in Misa river at night.
Corso II Giugno bridge at night
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night. Portici Ercolani (Ercolani's Arcades) are sequence of 126 arches of Istria stone along the right bank of Misa river in Senigallia, Ancona, Italy. They owe their name to Monsignor Giuseppe Ercolani (1677-1759) who designed them in the mid-eighteenth century to house the many merchants who arrived in town in July, for the famous trade fair named after St. Mary Magdalene.
Portici Ercolani reflected in Misa river at night